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Bounce Tackles Police Brutality In New Original Docuseries ‘Protect or Neglect’ World Premieres Oct. 27

Entertainment

Bounce Tackles Police Brutality In New Original Docuseries ‘Protect or Neglect’ World Premieres Oct. 27

ATLANTA (Oct. 20, 2021) – Bounce, the first broadcast and multi-platform entertainment network serving African Americans, will explore the topic of policing and the Black community with the world premiere of “Protect or Neglect” at 8 p.m. ET Wednesday, Oct. 27. The exclusive new, one-hour Bounce Original documentary will be available on Bounce’s popular subscription streaming service Brown Sugar starting Oct. 28.

“Protect or Neglect” looks at decades of turmoil between the Black community and police officers. With interviews from brutality survivors, academics, civil rights attorneys, former police staff and entertainment luminaries, the special looks to address the age-old question: “Who guards the guardians?”

“The deaths of Sandra Bland, Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin, Breanna Taylor, George Floyd and too many others have drawn worldwide attention, and the powerful voice of the Black Lives Matter movement has sparked a global conversation on the subject of the treatment and value of Black people in America,” said Bounce general manager Cheryle Harrison. “Bounce plays an important role in the Black community, and ‘Protect or Neglect’ was produced to amplify this discussion and let voices be heard.”

Among those interviewed in “Protect or Neglect:” Cedric The Entertainer and his daughter Lucky Kyles, political activist and former House member Stacey Abrams, retired LAPD sergeant Cheryl Dorsey, “A Million Little Things” producer Royale Watkins and the co-stars/co-executive producers of Bounce’s “Johnson,” Deji LaRay and Thomas Q. Jones.

Cedric The Entertainer talks openly with his daughter about the emotional toll she deals with watching people who look like her die at the hands and knees of police officers who took an oath to protect. 

Dorsey questions the behavior displayed repeatedly towards the Black community by police officers, which, she said, will only end when those officers take responsibility for their actions and are held accountable. When it comes to the police, USC Law Professor Jody Armor vehemently recounts an experience he calls the “Black tax” – a common theme shared by the voices in the documentary. 

Abrams, a former candidate for Georgia governor, shares her story of not being let into her own graduation celebration. “It’s not a figment of our imagination,” she says. Jones comments on crimes committed by police officers, while LaRay offers, “I think too many people still don’t acknowledge that abuse exists. …We have to have law enforcement that are willing to not keep this wall of silence.”

According to a Pew Research Center study, nearly 92% of white officers surveyed believe Black people in the U.S. have equal rights, compared to only 29% of Black officers. The documentary asks the question: “How much longer must the Black community go on feeling neglected?”

Celebrity photographer and disabled Vietnam veteran Jerome Dorn embodies the very definition of resilience. Born in Philadelphia, the fifth of seven children, Dorn stayed focused throughout his youth, eventually obtaining his degree in Criminal Justice. Dorn has worked with the Philadelphia Police Department, Department of Justice, World Wide Detective Agency, and several other high profile security groups. Throughout his successful career, Dorn wrestled with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, an aftereffect of his military service. Battling the pain and debilitating effect of PTSD, Dorn found comfort behind the camera. Photography proved to be not only therapeutic, but life changing as well. Dorn picked up his first camera in 1970 while serving in Vietnam and knew instantly that behind the lens was where he belonged. His shooting style and photographs were special, generating a buzz in the industry. In 1985, he began his career in photojournalism, working in a variety of genres. Dorn’s credentials include fashion, lifestyle photography, photojournalism, and celebrity/red carpet coverage. Working with MSNBC, Jet Magazine, and major publications in Philadelphia and around the country, Dorn has had the honor of capturing the images of hundreds of notable celebrities and politicians including President Barack Obama, George Bush Jr, Bill and Hillary Clinton, Maya Angelou, Jesse Jackson, Rihanna, Snoop Dog, Will Smith, and Tyler Perry. Photography has sent Dorn around the globe, inspiring his passion for civil activism. In 1995, Dorn assembled and led a group of forty-two men to the Million Man March. Together, they spent five days walking from Philadelphia to Washington DC. In his travels, Dorn observed a common theme amongst the youth of the world. Many of the children he encountered seemed lost. Understanding that opportunities for at-risk youth are minimal, Dorn was inspired to make a difference. Established by Dorn in 2011, InDaHouseMedia was built on the idea that there is room in the house for everyone. With InDaHouseMedia, Dorn’s mission is to provide the future generation with positive direction through sports, music, and photography.

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